2017 National In-Service Conference

The NAfME National Conference is the only music education conference where you can connect and collaborate with music educators from all over the world. NAfME can offer tools and techniques to help your students learn and create in new and inspiring ways. 

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Collegiate NAfME members

Join us in Washington, D.C., this June, for mentoring and professional development that will empower you to be the advocate you need to be, for yourself, and for your students. Help lead our next steps in this new era for music education.

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FEATURES AND NEWS

Did You Bring the P.I.E.?

Did You Bring the P.I.E.? By NAfME member Jenny L. Neff, Ed.D. This article first appeared on Zeswitz Music’s Blog. Many educators have started the school year feeling refreshed and excited to create new learning opportunities for their students. Along with this comes the chance to upgrade how things have been done in the past in designing better lessons and musical experiences.     What new tools will you bring to the planning process? How can you ensure students have meaningful musical experiences as part of their music education? Perhaps…

P.I.E.
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NAfME Awards Two, Two-Year Research Projects on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Music Education

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Media Contact: Catherina Hurlburt  catherinah@nafme.org or (703) 860-4000, x216 National Association for Music Education Awards Two, Two-Year Research Projects on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Music Education   RESTON, VA (May 25, 2017)—As part of an ongoing series of research projects that the National Association for Music Education (NAfME) has funded, the leading association for music educators has awarded two new research projects to study important issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion in music education. The award recipients are the University of Connecticut, Dr. Joseph Abramo and…

The One* Thing Every New Music Teacher Should Know

The One* Thing Every New Music Teacher Should Know *And a Few Other Considerations for First-Year Teachers By NAfME Member Audrey Carballo     According to Wikipedia, Tempus fugit is a Latin phrase, usually translated into English as “time flies.” The expression comes from Virgil‘s Georgics. The phrase is expressed as a proverb that means “time’s a-wasting.” Tempus fugit, however, is typically employed as an admonition against sloth and procrastination, much like carpe diem—Seize the Day!   Pieces of the Puzzle As I was thinking of the one pearl of…

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